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Tuesday, June 30, 2020

See and Slay: Italian Style Beef Short Ribs w/ Parmesan Cheddar Mash



The cool weather days at the cabin made for a deliciously decadent comfort food recipe.  I found some short ribs at the local grocer for a virtual steal and grabbed them up, just in case the opportunity arose for some soulful and hearty mealtime.  If the chance would not have presented itself, they simply would have been frozen and transported back home to our freezer there.  The temperatures at the lake plummeted around Tuesday, bringing cold, overcast and pain filled days, as my RA would not be still and all my rebuilt parts reminded me that it was only around 50*F out, even cooler in the wake of dawn.  So much so, that my hands felt like ice and were prickly when I came inside from having coffee on the deck.  Not really what I had mind for summer vacation initially, but every day is a good on vacation, right? I had some fresh herbs on hand and some fire roasted tomatoes and wine, plus the usual aromatics like onion and garlic, so I went forth and created this recipe, full of warm flavors and depth, comforting and soothing to my stomach and bones.  
The twins came over the next day, and I was able to share with them also, my brother in law too.  This made an awesome impromptu elevated lunch and I felt like the 'Belle of the Ball', with no leg work other than a masterful reheat and thoughtful service.  I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as my older sisters and I did.  My tween and teen were somewhat passé on the whole deal, but they did try it and liked it well enough.  This is 'grown folks food' I later went on to say, you guys wouldn't understand' and with a jovial laugh, I then proceeded to plan a more teen and tween friendly dish to accommodate the 'youngins', Bronwyn's Omurice.  

Recipe:

3 lbs. beef short ribs, bone in
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
2 green onions, trimmed and sliced, green and white parts
3 cloves garlic, smashed 
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 sprig fresh rosemary
2 c. beef stock
1 cup full bodied red wine, I used a 2016 Malbec
1 15 oz. can diced fire roasted tomatoes with juices
1/4 c. fresh parsley, rough chopped plus more for garnish
2 tbs. butter, unsalted
1 tsp. Italian seasoning mixed with 2 tbs. ap flour
Olive oil for drizzling
AP flour
SPST (Salt and Pepper to Suit Taste)

In a heavy bottomed pan over medium high heat, drizzled with olive oil, a pat of the butter and the smashed garlic.
 Brown short ribs that have been SPST.
Brown in batches, as not to crowd pan, add the second pat of butter for additional batches.
After final batches browned, toss in fresh herbs and onions.
Cook to for several minutes until fragrant.
Transfer to a medium sized heavy bottomed saucepan and add stock and wine.
Bring up to a boil, for about 3 minutes to burn off alcohol, then reduce heat to medium and add tomatoes .
Simmer , covered for about 4 to 5 hours or until ribs are tender and ready to fall off bone and liquid is reduced.
Make a slurry with 2 tbsp. flour and 1 tsp. Italian seasoning and remove pot from heat and stir in.
Put back onto heat and simmer for an additional 5 minutes or until slightly thickened.
Adjust seasonings as necessary.  
Makes 6 to 8 servings.


Parmesan Cheddar Mash
3 lbs. russet potatoes, cooked
1/4 c. 2 % milk
1/2 c. grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 c. shredded Sharp Cheddar
2 tbs. butter, unsalted
Olive oil for drizzling
SPST

Mash hot potatoes in a medium bowl, add milk, butter and cheeses.  Blend into rusticly smooth mash . Drizzle with olive oil and scallop the top for an interesting presentation.

Makes about 8 servings.
































Monday, June 29, 2020

Grillin', Chillin' and Avoiding Electrocution



If you enjoy having a nice flame kissed protein on the grill, now is the time.  Going out is a real treat if it's in your budget or can be done safely, but you can save time and money, just doing it at home or on a family outing.  The cabin where we stayed offers a fabulous grilling area that includes a picnic table, grill and a post for hanging and cleaning fish or lanterns, the choice would be yours.  With the price of beef, pork and chicken beginning to skyrocket in some places, it may be a good idea to grab a cut of steak or two now, as opposed to later, when the prices may be insufferable.  I was able to get these steaks at a great price on this particular day, under $15, for 5!!!  I chose thinly cut Ribeyes and New York Strips, all quickly marinated in a combination of Dale's, fresh garlic and olive oil.  I like to add a splash of seasoned rice vinegar for a burst of acid and tang.  Also for its tenderizing properties.  The zucchini were marinated in an item new to me, Mushroom Flavored Soy Sauce, I found at the local grocer on location and also a bit of the rice vinegar and fresh lemon juice.  
I fought the rain in an effort to get my grill on, while on our trip.  There was a small break in the maelstrom of torrential downpours of about an hour.  By the time I infused the steaks with enough smokiness from the hickory chips and had them browned on both sides, they had cooked through because of their thin cuts.  Like many times before during that week, I had to run for cover, of course not before snapping a couple of photos to share. The rain wasn't so much of an issue, as was the rumbling and tumbling of the thunder, accompanied by lightning, that reverberated through the sky and objects around me.  'High stakes grilling, with a lot at steak' lol pun intended without a doubt, but I had to get at least one grilled dinner out of 7 nights. Afterwards, I was free to chill and finish dinner with leisurely sides I had on hand.  I do not recommend the aforementioned, even remotely playing around with weather notices, thunder and lightning, only the grilling portion! 














Sunday, June 28, 2020

Cotton Candy Clouds and A Strawberry Jam



For this post I had to feature a photo I took  of some bodaciously buxom clouds that remind me of many things, one of which is cotton candy.  They seem light and fluffy, spun on a long, paper cone, full of sugary sweetness, pink and blue that screams childhood fancies.  They seem to smell like bubble gum and blue raspberry, staining your tongues and fingers, sticky, not unlike toffee and fun to share with friends.  I invoked these happy thoughts because they soften the blow of this strawberry 'jam' that I have found myself in at present. 
 I tried my hand at making this popular and spectacularly country feeling condiment, as they are in season and abundant.  I wanted to add this to our pantry for now and down the road, for a burst of fruit goodness, anytime during the rest of the year.  As simple as it should sound and seem, I had a couple of oversights which turned my blue skies grey.  The first mistake I made was add water, way too much.  Additionally, I started the berries in my canning pot instead of my usual heavy bottomed, sturdy pots that promote even heating and cooking.  I knew better, but continued anyway, too excited I guess and a bit distracted, fatal flaws when sailing new culinary waters.  I could have done my homework, as I normally do, but this time was different.  I should have at least returned to some of my past references for guidance, alas that I did not do also. 
 The beautiful bright, scarlet berries' color leeched away and the darn things started to adhere to the bottom of the thin, poorly insulated pot, and then scorch, I removed them from the pot, washed and scoured said vessel and repeated the same fiasco, the strawberry flavored, blackberry looking slurry stuck and scorched a bit further. The fact that I was doing chores at the time likely facilitated this initial scorching, but I thought at least one pair of the nostrils in the house would detect this scenario the first time.  My ego is a little bruised, yet not so much that I would even consider not retrying.   I am human, a Culinarian, a Kitchen Warrior and in order to appreciate a recipe gone well, one must also appreciate one that goes horribly awry.  I have gained hands on experience, which is good to have.  I am going to finish what I so hastily started and see if there is any salvage possible, therein lies the lesson and hopefully not be in this 'Strawberry Jam' again! And to think, I successfully made Mulberry Jam for the first time, just 3 weeks ago. SMDH. 





















Friday, June 26, 2020

Low Country Boil: Less Trouble, Less Toil


A low country boil makes for a low maintenance, filling and inexpensive way to entertain your family or guests and make a memorable experience out of an ordinary day.  With some simple layering and timing, crusty bread for dipping and a green salad, the table can be set for a hands on, fun filled social occasion not soon forgotten.  
When the meal is done, you can either serve in large trays or drain and pour contents out onto a picnic or large table onto some newspaper, with the juice as a dipping sauce!  This was a dinner prepared while on vacation at Occoneechee State Park to accompany some gorgeous Catch of the Day Catfish, the crew caught while fishing at Buggs Island Lake.  I also found some frogs' legs at the local supermarket for a splurge-fest of goodies, as I hadn't had them in about one year. 
 
Dinner was amazing, especially with good wine, great food and the best family, the twins and my brother in law, who came down also, we got together several times during the week.  Everyone had a role to play as we prepared the meal, making it a breeze.  We all cleaned the fish together, scaling, fileting and butterflying , depending on their sizes. Every hand wheeled a knife, pliers or gadget, making light work of  a potentially time consuming endeavor, considering we had about 30.  Together we're better, indeed.  Our haul included both catfish and crappie.  Some of the fish were soaked and packed in Ziplocs, then frozen to make the trip home and be enjoyed at a later date, while some was fried up nice and golden for dinner as pictured below.  A good salty, briny soak is essential for fresh fish to eliminate any 'fresh out of water' taste and also rid the fillets of a bit of the excess water it holds, which can prevent the crust from adhering the protein while frying. 
The whole pageantry of it all was soothing. The dance of the fishing and preparing and sharing, the communion and the preserving, for moments like this, when we return home to the rest of the family.  Memorable. One day at a time and being thankful for fellowship another day, Priceless. 
Recipe":
3 lb. potatoes, I used Russet, cut into manageable even sized pieces
2 lb. Polska Kielbasa or favorite smoked sausage, cut into 2 inch pieces
3 lb. 31-40 count shrimp, raw
4 ears of corn, cut into quarters
1 stick butter
Seafood Seasoning
Fresh Lemon Slices and Lemon Wedges for serving
Fresh Parsley for Garnish, optional
Olive oil for drizzling
SPST (Salt and Pepper to Suit Taste)

In a large pot, bring about 1 1/2 quarts of seafood and lemon seasoned water.
Once water comes to a boil over medium high heat. add potatoes. 
Drizzle with olive oil.
Cover with lid.
Reduce heat to Medium, so that the water is a simmering boil.
After about 15 minutes, add Kielbasa pieces.
After another 5 minutes add corn nubbins.
After another 3 minutes, add shrimp. Sprinkle, Drizzle and SPST.
Continue to cook until all shrimp are pink and translucent.
Place pats of butter across top of contents and cover to melt.
Sprinkle with Seafood Seasoning as desired.
Serve with lemon wedges, cocktail sauce, crusty bread for dipping, beer, wine, friends and family.
Serves 8 to 10 comfortably with extras and a side of happy!










Tokyo Treat July Box Rocks!



Thursday, June 25, 2020

Jewels on the Virginia Nile



Aside for the much needed change of scenery and time to re-center, this past week brought some pleasant surprises along with the rain that hung out there for the whole trip.  I am a coffee appreciator and lifelong fan. I happened by this robust and flavorful caramel noted brew at the supermarket in Clarksville, the town on the bustling Buggs Island Lake.  
This is a superb place for relaxing, water skiing, wakeboarding camping and fishermen alike, from leisure to pro sport, walking or by boat, the activities of this are bountiful and the atmosphere is magical.  The above is a picture of the coffee I discovered and just had to try.  I am an advocate of local, small businesses and believe in doing my part, when and where I can.  The object in the front is a piece of driftwood I found on the shore behind our cabin. I find it full of character and as a piece of natural water/nature made art.
The coffee itself is from a small batch roastery called Lake Gaston Coffee Company, situated in Littleton, North Carolina.   Lake Gaston is a manmade lake with about 35 miles of shoreline.  It is situated near Buggs Island Lake or John H. Kerr Dam, which is a  50,000 acre reservoir. It was constructed between 1947 and 1957, as a means of hydroelectricity and flood control.  This massive lake extends into North Carolina. I admiringly call it The Virginia Nile.
Lake Gaston Coffee Company offer both Arabica whole bean and ground roast in an array of flavors and intensities brewed from beans from all over the world, including South and Central America and East  Africa.  They also offer teas, wine slushies, Lattes to go, Farm Sciences CBD oil and much more! They even have a small coffee shop located in Littleton.  
I have fallen in love with this fabulous bag of coffee and I am eager to try more.  Good news should not be kept to oneself, so I thought I'd share it with you.  Stay tuned for more updates on products and coffee talk.  This roast was indeed as described with a satisfyingly hearty flavor and true notes of caramel chews and toothpicks made from cherry wood.  
Anytime is a good time for coffee in my book and the constant cool showers and uncharacteristically, inclement weather, presented the perfect storm for trying a new hot beverage. 
 I generally go for medium roasts, since I drink quite a bit of it, but this Buggs Island Lake Columbia grind, with my skimmed down amounts, was just a darling!  I've provided a link for your discovery and enjoyment.  This micro-roastery is a real gem.  https://lakegastoncoffee.com/ 







Wednesday, June 24, 2020

See and Slay: Bronwyn's Omurice


One of the best things about being in a new kitchen is the possibility of new and fresh recipe ideas that spawn from the environment or chemistry the new locale creates.  Additionally, I like to make the dishes my girls' think up or want on the dinner/meal agenda come to fruition.  Doing this is good culinary exercise and keeps me on my 'game', plus it keeps us from falling into the comfort zone rut of cooking and taking the easy way out, instead of going for elevated and diverse cuisines.  Moreover, it keeps the kids excited about meals that would otherwise go unnoticed. 
This particular day on vacation, Bronwyn mentioned a dish called Omurice. Omurice (pronounced Ahm-Yoo-rice) is traditionally fried rice, usually with chicken,  wrapped in an omelette.  I was oblivious initially about what that was, Bronwyn graciously ushered my phone from my hands and pulled it up on Google.  I was immediately intrigued once I began my research, finding its origin and ingredient call, the proper technique and the variations, then looking to put my spin on it, but keeping it true to its form.  I am an avid fan of Japanese cuisine as well as many other Asian countries and regions.  In fact, my cooking style is best described in large part, as a fusion between Southern American and Pan Asian cuisine respectively. 
Omurice was invented in the early 80's as a way to combine Japanese cuisine with our Western Culture. The other way this is served is quite an art.  The fluffy egg is placed atop the rice and a slit is made down the length of the cloud-like, custardy deliciousness and you can watch it cascade down its sides for a most glorious presentation.  I haven't tried this yet, but soon will.


I named this dish after Bronwyn for her admiration and respect of Japanese culture and her love of Anime. 

Recipe: 
2 cups cooked yellow rice or other cooked rice of choice,
using 25 % less water.
In a medium pan, over medium high heat, drizzled with Olive oil and a pat of butter
2 cloves garlic, smashed. Add to oil while heating up and sauté
1 chicken breast, about 4 oz. boneless/skinless, small cubed and SPST, sautéed in olive oil.
Add chicken.  After it is cooked through, browned and no longer pink, about 4 minutes, Add:
1/2 cup Cole slaw mix, classic style 
1/2 c. Romaine greens with carrot  
1/4 c. each fresh parsley and cilantro, rough chopped
2 chopped green onions or to taste, green and white parts
Sauté with chicken for about 2 minutes and remove garlic and chop, put chopped garlic back. 
Add rice.

 

Fold together over medium heat .


Add 2 tbsp. ketchup and 2 tsp. organic, less sodium soy
.  Stir and fold  until combined.  Transfer to a bowl or dish.
 Mix together 1 egg with 1 tbsp. of milk for every  person to be served.  Make one omelets at a time, 
Add 2 tbsp. sharp shredded cheese to one side of omelets and add a portion of the chicken fried rice to the middle and fold each side over the mound in the middle. Shake the omelets down to one side of pan and flip onto plate. Carefully shape into oblong fashion and garnish with ketchup. 



















Monday, June 22, 2020

Quit Wishin', Go Fishin' and Kick Some Bass



 
This past weeekend, we wrapped up a fabulous week long stay at the beautiful Occoneechee State Park.  This relaxing and scenic area, is also host to Buggs Island Lake, Virginia's largest, that extends into North Carolina!  This area  is one of the most popular fishing hubs, with prize winning fish coming from these vast and diverse waters. The above picture is taken from the 'back yard' of the cabin in which we stayed.  We felt completely secure, as the cabins are all private and the only human to human contact is on the initial check-in.  
Our crew was able to do a good amount of fishing and bringing in a decent haul, considering the fact that it rained, hard and steady, for days, literally everyday.  This is the first time we've encountered such consistent rains in one visit.  There was local flooding by nearby towns' streets, creeks and underpasses, but we were unaffected. 
 Our first fish of the season was actually a gift, from a couple that was on their last day and donated their bait as well.  The fish was a beautiful white bass pictured below.  The size was perfect for an impromtu Catch of the Day meal, with my on hand ingredients of fresh lemon, green onions, garlic and some staples; olive oil, butter and truffle oil.  With a hot oven, I open roasted the bass, which I personally dressed, at 400 degrees for 15 minutes, then baked at 350*F for an additional 15 minutes, until it flaked with a fork and had some good carmelization on the exterior, about 30 minutes  total. I like to go a little long on our fish, because we prefer the meat a bit more firm than the suggested temperature for doneness would have it.  
I served the fish with a simple packaged Cheddar Broccoli Rice blend and a fresh green salad.  If you haven't gotten a chance to do so, having a Catch of the Day meal is the way to go. It's an amazing way to start off a little R&R, at your favorite camping, fishing or refuge destination. It's good to get a little messy sometimes, live a little!  Get out there and kick some BASS!  



















Thursday, June 11, 2020

Mulberry Molten Cakes w/Lemon Curd and Blueberries


Summer has a flavor and it's bright, tangy, fresh, creamy and AH-mazing.This recipe is inspired by a delicious classic, Lemon Meringue Pie and anything with a molten center, hot or cold.  I used a combination of homemade and store bought ingredients, along with some fresh picked and homegrown  delights like the Mulberries, scratch made Lemon Curd and mint from my herb garden.  The cakes are a simple store bought boxed variety of French Vanilla, with the freshly picked mulberries nestled in the bottom of each one.  
The mulberries have a fleeting existence, subject to the elements of wind and nature, the birds, who quickly make light work of the sweet ripened berries, that will fall at the slightest touch when ready to enjoy.  My youngest Bronwyn assisted in gathering the berries from our backyard, which are a part of the breadfruit and fig family and grown in China for its leaves, which are the only variety of leaf a Silkworm will eat! Mulberries provide an array of noteworthy vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. These gems contain  Vitamin C and K, iron, potassium, fiber, polyphenols and anthocyanins giving their brilliant dark red color, plus rutin and myracetin, which are both excellent compounds for reducing cancer risks. 
The sweet tang of the curd is a first time for me, inspired by a Lemon Curd recipe from a popular site.  The icing is of the whipped variety, a specialty item from the grocer, favored for its icing consistency, but without the sickly sweet taste of some traditional icings.  The whipped icing helps to keep this recipe 'light', in taste and mouthfeel.   
The family received the recipe well, as did I.  They are easy enough to make for a special dinner dessert or as a great bring-along to your next cookout, when the opportunity permits.  




Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Jamaican Me Dinner Tonight

 
I ran across this authentic Caribbean jerk marinade called Walkerswood, (hot and spicy of course) in a local supermarket, some months ago.  For my protein, I used cuts of pork loin and allowed it to marinate for 24 hours+.  The results were phenomenal.  The spice blend shone through bright with smells and flavors of nutmeg, allspice and cinnamon. These are all warm spices with distinct presence.  Along with thyme, black pepper and even ginger, this marinade packs a delicious and culture rich punch to the tastebuds, and the heat is a balanced and hearty luxury.  An open roast or low flame would serve this protein best, illuminating the flavor profile and closer to its true Jerk meaning.  I am without the traditional steel drum or cooking kettle, but your grill will do just fine. 
 I paired this island delight with some Jasmine Rice cooked in chicken stock and Thai Peanut sauce marinated chickpeas!  The flavors were complementary and filling.  Some chopped sage and thyme from my herb garden, accompanies pork very well.  The heat of the marinated pork is balanced by the mild rice, spicy sweet with Thai Chili Sauce and the Mellow, Nutty and sweet flavor profile of the nutritous and vitamin rich garbanzo beans. I also spiked them with a dash of fish sauce. The combination of four different cuisines on the same plate, Jamaican, Thai, Chinese and Indian, overlap and connect with just a few ingredients. Many cultures cuisines are just that, a melding of all the individual groups of people, leaving their marks along their paths through the world.  I like that. 













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Sunday, June 7, 2020

Rice Balls w/ Anchovy and Pineapple





I made rice balls for the first time during these last several weeks, at the request of my youngest and Anime fanatic, Bronwyn and they are a real treat.  The best part about them is that they are virtually a blank canvas for any toppings you can dream up.  This particular version features two ingredients that I think work really well together as far as flavor contrast and balance goes.
 Since this was a spur of the moment request, I didn't have any smoked salmon or crab to top these off or bury in its center, as the initial recipe suggested.  Bronwyn wanted them plain anyway, so no buried treasures of simmered ginger infused pork or spicy beef was anywhere in sight.  I topped my rice balls with delicate and umami forward portions of canned anchovy and complimented the saltiness with the sweetness of freshly cut pineapple pieces.  The black sesame seeds provided a nice nuttiness and  pop of color.
Sticky rice is a rather labor intensive dish, though it is not difficult.  The most important factor is rinsing the rice to remove the starch. It must be done so many, many times.  There is a particular variety of rice traditionally used for this by the Japanese called Sushi rice, also known as glutinous rice, which is sticky when cooked.  For this recipe, I chose to use Jasmine rice, though it is not as sticky when cooked as the suited rice.  It did however perform well.
For this recipe, I simply vigorously rinsed the rice several times and cooked according to the indications on the rice label, but I use 1 1/2 cups of water for every 2 cups of rice.   I then drizzled the rice with mirin mixed with seasoned rice vinegar, while in front of a fan, constantly tossing and turning the rice for even coating.  Afterwards, I took portions of the rice and attempted to shape them into the traditional triangles, but opted for the balls, because they were easier.  lol.
We used low sodium soy, smoked tamari and Thai Chili Sauce for dipping.

































































Saturday, June 6, 2020

Good Eatin'; Crispy Fried Pork Loin and Cat-Head Biscuits



Country Fried Pork Loin on Homemade Biscuits

Today is an homage to Southern American goodness.  There's nothing quite like a fried piece of protein, hot off the paper towels and stuffed into a big ole biscuit.  I hadn't made homemade biscuits since winter, which seemed to leave only a week or two ago (if I were using temperatures  as a guide) We were in the mood for something like we would get from eating breakfast out.  
The first thing that came to mind was the biscuits.  For me, being a 'country girl' firmly establishes a principle of being able to 'make bread' from scratch.  I also had to 'master' macaroni and cheese, potato salad, greens, pinto beans and many other items, to be certifiable with seven sisters who also cook! The biscuits may be served stand alone, with butter, jellies and jam, smothered in gravy, plain or as the vessel by which one can consume a crunchy, boneless, piping hot portion of chicken, beef or pork.
  I've heard biscuits referred to as "cathead" all my life, those are the larger than normal sized, proportionate to the size of a cat's head, hand shaped biscuits.  Perfect shapes and cuts are not your judge when you make cathead biscuits, as time is usually of the essence and you need to get it done. I think I am the only of my sisters that uses cutters; bread, cookie or otherwise, though I learned to 'make bread' on free form catheads. The size of  my version uses a larger sized cutter, ( an empty 20 oz. can of pineapple, with both ends removed). With it's size, one can accommodate any filling or addition with ease, like a sandwich bread.    That way, the food can travel and be sturdy enough to handle the wares of the day, plus be filling, all at the same time. 

Recipe:
1 1/2 to 2 lbs. boneless pork loin, sliced into 1/4 inch pieces or about 12 total
Seasoned flour
Buttermilk Pancake mix
SPST (Salt and Pepper to Suit Taste)
Oil for Frying
Cat-Head Biscuits


Heat oil to 375*F.
Meanwhile, soak the slices in a salted water solution, until ready to cook.
This helps to extract some of the water from the pork and promote a golden crust that will stick to the protein. 
Drain and Rinse the pork well before cooking.  
Lay on paper towels to facilitate moisture extraction, flipping once.
Combine the flour and pancake mix using a 3 to 1 ratio, (1 part pancake mix to every 3 parts seasoned flour and shake well until evenly incorporated.
Dredge moist loin slices in flour mixture, shaking off the excess and fry them in small batches.
Fry until loin is floating and golden brown, about 4 minutes, give or take depending on maintaining oil temperature and space in the cooking vessel. Also the bubbles will have subsided considerably. If  you listen carefully, you can hear the frying sound decrease when all the steam has escaped under the pressure of frying.
Remove from oil and drain on paper towels.  
Cut biscuit in half horizontally and add fried loin. 
Best when served immediately, but keep well and will still be delicious at room temperature.
Serves 6 to 8, with a couple of extras for seconds or a guest or yourself, for later! 

Cat-Head Biscuits

4 cups AP flour, preferably bread flour, plus more if needed
1 tbsp. double acting baking POWDER
1 tsp. or less fine grain Himalayan Pink Salt or kosher
1 stick unsalted butter, frozen 
2/3 c. shortening or plant butter
1 1/2 c. buttermilk or plain 2 % milk 

Preheat oven to 450*F.
In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt until well blended.
Cut in shortening with a fork, until the flour takes on a crumbly texture.
Using a grater, grate in butter, gradually and toss with flour mixture after each round of grating to distribute the butter and keep it from clumping together.
Make a well in the center of flour and pour in buttermilk.  
Using a fork, stir from center, bringing in parts of the flour gradually. 
Stir until a loose and sticky dough is formed. 
Add flour as needed to your hands to make dough knead-able, and lightly knead for about 1 minute.
Tear off portions of dough and shape into discs, about a small palmful, use your judgement for size and intended purpose.
Place on un-greased baking sheet and brush with a small amount of buttermilk mixed with water.
Bake until golden, about 13 minutes, depending on size.
Glaze with additional butter if desired.
Makes about 10 Cathead biscuits.


Another recipe for Cathead Biscuits, Denese's Cornflake and Buttermilk Biscuits


Before I go......





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